My maternal aunt researched our ancestry, beginning in 1950 and into the 1970’s. Her research was not published; she compiled her ancestry in several notebooks. She gave me a copy of those notebooks, as well as numerous letters she received from genealogy correspondents. Her compiled genealogy often did not state the source for either relationships or facts. Her research was extensive and provided excellent clues for my research focused on two primary objectives: 1) reliable records and/or proof statements to either support or refute her findings, especially for direct line ancestors and their siblings; and 2) expand her research to identify more distant ancestors and to update the family history to include more recent generations.

Reviewing and discussing her family history research was fascinating, and created a question regarding my paternal ancestry.  I soon discovered that no compiled genealogy existed for my paternal ancestry, and most family members possessed only scattered documentation and facts. I became aware of several family stories, with conflicting facts often cited by each storyteller. So my first attempts in genealogy research involved searching for documentation that corroborated or corrected the facts from these stories. Experiences with these first attempts created a passion for research, but much less  passion for keeping records of my searches, preparing and following research plans or focusing on discrete research questions or objectives.

The purpose of “Anglo-Saxon Okie” is the preservation of the process and results of my ancestral researh for future generations while encouraging communication and data exchange among current generation “cousins.”